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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

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threw out the motion by a majority of sixty-seven, 253 against 186. The Prince had declared so openly for union and agreement in all measures, that, except the Nepotisma, all his servants but one were with us. I don't know whether they will attempt anything else, but with these majorities we must have an easy winter. The union of the Whigs has saved this Parliament. It is expected that Pitt and Lyttelton will be dismissed by the Prince3. That faction and Waller are the only Whigs of any note that do not join with the Court. I do not count Dodington, who must now be always with the minority, for no majority will accept him. It is believed that Lord Gower will retire, or be desired to do so. I suppose you have heard from Rome, that Murray is made Solicitor-General *, in the room of Sir John Strange, who has resigned for his health. This is the sum of politics; we can't expect any winter (I hope no winter will be) like the last. By the crowds that come hither, one should not know that Sir Robert is out of place, only that now he is scarce abused.
De reste, the town is wondrous dull; operas unfrequented, plays not in fashion, amours as old as marriages—in short, nothing but whisk5! I have not yet learned to play, but I find that I wait in rain for its being left off. . . .6
I agree with you about not sending home the Dominiehin in an English vessel; but what I mentioned to you of its coming in a Dutch vessel, if you find an opportunity, I think will be very safe, if you approve it; but manage that as you like. I shall hope for my statue at the same
2  The ' Cobham Cousins.1
3  Pitt remained Groom of the Bedchamber to the  Prince  of Wales until 1745, when he resigned.   Lyttelton (Secretary to the Prince) was dismissed by the   latter (1744) on his appointment as a Lord of the Treasury in  the  'Broad  Bottom' Administration.
* Murray's brother, the titular Earl of Dunbar, was a prominent person at the Chevalier's court.
fi Whist was just becoming popular in 'society.' Hoyle's Short Treatise on Whist was first published in this year (1742).
6 Passage omitted.